Home Messaging

Below are the M3AAWG published materials related to our messaging anti-abuse work. There is also a Messaging video playlist on our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/maawg and there are a few selected videos on our website in the Training Videos and Keynotes Videos sections under the Meetings menu tab.

Best Practices

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December 01, 2005

Managing Port 25 for Residential or Dynamic IP Space Benefits of Adoption and Risks of Inaction

Recommendations include blocking unauthorized access to and from port 25, requiring authentication, and aggregating email traffic through a SMTP server that is controlled by the service provider

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January 02, 2005

MAAWG Code of Conduct for Messaging System Operators

Outlines a voluntary set of principles for messaging system operators that discourages bulk messaging abuse of peer-to-peer messaging platforms

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Public Policy Comments

March 31, 2010

MAAWG Comments on ARIN Draft Policy 2010-3 “Customer Confidentiality”

MAAWG submitted comments in March 2010. As recommended by MAAWG and others, ARIN changed course on this topic.
The initial draft policy would have allowed ISPs to hide the true customer of a domain name. The revised Version 2 policy that was implemented recognized the need for the customer name to remain in the SWIP and RWHOIS information.

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M3AAWG Reports

DM3Z Blog

Updates and Commentary from the Messaging, Malware and Mobile Anti-Abuse Working Group

None at this time.

News

Articles About M3AAWG

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June 08, 2016

EXPERTS TO FCC: CHANGE COURSE ON BROADBAND PRIVACY RULES INDUSTRY GROUPS AND EXPERTS AGREE: THE FCC MUST CHANGE COURSE ON BROADBAND PRIVACY

Fixed Wireless Internet Service Providers Association 

http://www.wispa.org/News/wispa_news_06-08-16_Experts_to_FCC

"A coalition of industry groups including WISPA, CTA, CTIA, and US Telecom today published a joint article in opposition to the FCC’s proposed new rules for broadband privacy protection . . . The Messaging, Malware and Mobile Anti-Abuse Working Group similarly warned that the rules as currently framed could inadvertently undermine cooperation and communication needed to secure the web from malware, viruses and hackers online. . . "

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